As we predicted earlier this year, Congress is making moves toward enacting cosmetics reform legislation in the near future. In late October 2017, Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) introduced S. 2003, the “FDA Cosmetic Safety and Modernization Act,” which we will refer to as the “Hatch bill” for purposes of this post.

The proposed legislation would amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act by introducing measures to regulate ingredients, monitor adverse reactions to cosmetics, and establish good manufacturing practices. Under the Hatch bill, FDA would receive authority to accredit third-party organizations in order to determine chemical safety. The Hatch bill also would preempt any state action on cosmetic chemical ingredients once FDA identifies a chemical for review. We summarize key sections of the Hatch bill below. Continue Reading A “Surprise” Cosmetic Reform Bill Appears in Congress; Bipartisan Compromise Continues to Be Legislators’ Goal

As we’ve previously reported, FDA has signaled its interest in reviewing the scope and meaning of the nutrient content claim “healthy,” in part as result of a dispute with KIND LLC about label claims for its KIND Bar products. Then last fall FDA released a new guidance document on what constitutes a “healthy” food and proper labeling of such foods, and the Agency simultaneously requested public input on a significant number of questions related to use of this particular claim.

Last week, FDA announced two actions that are intended to further advance this public consultation process for “healthy” label claims. First, it has extended the comment period that was initiated in October with the release of the draft guidance document until April 26, 2017. And it is convening a public meeting to discuss the use of the term “healthy” in the labeling of human food products, in part to further the feedback that may be received during this ongoing comment period. Continue Reading Reexamination of “Healthy” Continues with an FDA Public Meeting in March 2017

As we have discussed in previous posts, Congress may be moving towards finally enacting some long-awaited cosmetics reform legislation this year. On January 13, Representative Pete Sessions (R-TX) reintroduced his cosmetics modernization bill as H.R.575. The package of reforms was first introduced in November 2015 as the Cosmetic Modernization Amendments of 2015 (H.R.4075).

Overall, the proposed legislation would amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act with respect to FDA’s regulation of cosmetics by creating new requirements such as the registration of manufacturing establishments and the submission of a cosmetic and ingredient statement for each marketed cosmetic. It also would require cosmetic manufacturers, packers, and distributors to report to FDA any serious and unexpected adverse events caused by a cosmetic product. Likewise, cosmetic labels would be required to include contact information for consumers to report such events to the manufacturer or distributor.

Below, we break down in detail pertinent sections of the Sessions bill, as it was introduced in the previous Congress (although reports indicate that the reintroduced version has not been altered significantly). Continue Reading Cosmetics Reform Activity Begins in the 115th Congress

On December 6th, FDA announced that it is publicly releasing data received by the Agency’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) about adverse events related to cosmetics and foods, including both conventional foods and dietary supplements.  Adverse events can be any negative reaction to a product, such as a serious illness or allergic reactions, or other complaints like packaging problems, that are received through FDA’s voluntary adverse event reporting systems for these classes of regulated products (except for in the case of dietary supplement manufacturers, who have mandatory reporting obligations).

The CFSAN Adverse Event Reporting System, called “CAERS,” includes data from reports submitted by consumers, medical professionals, and industry. The initial data file made public by the Agency contains CAERS data from January 2004 through September 2016. Continue Reading FDA Increases Transparency of Adverse Event Data for Cosmetics and Foods

Back in April 2015, Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced the Personal Care Products Safety Act (S.1014).  More recently, on September 22, 2016, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee received testimony from Senators Feinstein and Collins in support of this bipartisan legislation.  The HELP Committee also heard from experts in the cosmetics industry about product developments and health standards.

Witnesses in favor of the Personal Care Products Safety Act stated that the FDA has not done enough to ban endocrine-disrupting chemicals in cosmetic products and that industry-financed review programs should not substitute government regulatory programs in collecting chemical toxicity data.  They contrasted FDA’s inability to ban products unless they are “adulterated” with the more expansive authorities of similar regulatory agencies in Canada, Japan, and the European Union. Continue Reading Coming Soon to a Lawbook Near You – New Cosmetic Requirements